As a child, I had an acute fear of getting into the water. That fear was only exasperated when my father tried to teach me how to swim – because all he did was throw me in the deep end of a pool (literally) and keep an eye on me as I struggled to break the surface. With time, I learned how to swim and got over my fears. When I had kids, I decided that I would teach them to be comfortable in the water from an early age and that they would learn how to swim without fear. Here’s why I chose a hot tub to do so. 

 

A Controlled Environment

In my opinion, portable hot tubs are deep enough for a small child to swim in, while also allowing the accompanying adult to be seated. The environment is controlled, much like some people first teach children to hold their breath under water in a small inflatable pool. While I disagree with my father’s approach to teaching me how to swim, in hindsight I do remember that he made sure there was a lifeguard nearby, and that two of his friends were in the water right next to where I ended up in the water. He also made sure that the pool wasn’t crowded, so in his mind he had controlled the situation as much as he thought possible. 

 

Familiarity

In order to eliminate fear, I needed to make sure that my children were comfortable in the water before they ever attempted swimming. They would join us in the hot tub from as young as 5 or 6 years old (safety regulations don’t recommend allowing younger children to use hot tubs)—so my kids were very comfortable in the hot tub. They could sit up in the tub, and could even walk from one side to the other with no fear at all. I made sure they realized that if they ever feared swimming, they could just stand up and they’d be fine. 

 

Buoyancy and Salt Water Hot Tubs

Because I wanted the kids to be able to use the hot tub, I didn’t want to add too many chemicals in it. So, a chlorine salt generation system was the only option—this is a system that produces natural chlorine salt to sanitize the water. Not only did this make it safer and gentler on their skin and eyes, the increased salinity helped in adding to the buoyancy of the water, making it easier to swim. It may be a slight difference in buoyancy, but I felt it would make a world of difference to someone who is still learning how to swim and float. 

 

My children were comfortable swimming in larger bodies of water by the time they were 12, and they claim that the bubbly water of a hot tub helped them come to terms with the instability of sea water when compared to swimming pools. They had no problems  with being unable to see anything underwater,

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